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Archive for the ‘Environmentmentally Friendly Homes’ Category

NEW LISTING! 14218 Sandfield Drive, Houston, TX 77077 – MLS# 24831115

In Buying a Home, Environmentmentally Friendly Homes, Home Upgrades, Home Values, Houston Energy Corridor, Houston Real Estate Agent, Real Estate Investment, Selling your home, Terry Hershey Park on October 3, 2017 at 2:54 pm

NEW LISTING! 14218 Sandfield Drive, Houston, TX 77077 – MLS# 24831115

One story beauty completely remodeled. Step into your spacious living room with high-grade wood laminate and wall of windows for plenty of natural light. Dining area has courtyard views opens to kitchen with granite countertops and new Stainless Steel appliances. Huge flexible room with peaceful backyard view, perfect for study or a third bedroom. Remodeled master retreat with built ins and walk-in closet. Environmentally friendly landscaped front and backyard retreat with nice shady trees and patio. New Air Handler and inside pipes replaced. Never flooded. In Houston’s Energy Corridor. Walking distance to beautiful Terry Hershey Hike and Bike Trails.

HAR Link: http://www.har.com/14218-sandfield-drive/sale_24831115

If you are interested in buying or selling real estate in West Houston or the Energy Corridor, please contact Connie Vallone with First Market Realty at 713 249 4177  or visit www.houstonenergycorridorhomes.com  or www.vallonehomes.com .

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June to Become First-Ever National Healthy Homes Month

In Buying a Home, Environmentmentally Friendly Homes, Home Upgrades, Home Values, Houston Energy Corridor, Houston Real Estate Agent, Real Estate Investment, Selling your home on June 16, 2016 at 5:27 pm

Most Americans spend up to 90 percent of their time indoors, exposing them to home health and safety hazards ranging from asthma triggers to potentially deadly pollutants like asbestos and lead-based paint. To reinforce the connection between a family’s health and their homes, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is declaring this June as the first-ever National Healthy Homes Month. Launched by HUD’s Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes (OLHCHH), this month is designed to educate families of potential health hazards in a home, and empower them to create the healthiest home possible for their family.

This year’s theme is “Everyone Deserves a Safe and Healthy Home,” recognizing that people spend most of their time inside, and introduces them to healthy homes concepts while providing tips for keeping homes healthy and safe.

“National Healthy Homes Month calls attention to the fact that health and home safety are attainable for all,” says Michelle Miller, Acting Director of HUD’s Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes. “We are working closely with our federal partners, and many other organizations, to highlight the dangers of residential hazards to everyone, but especially children and other vulnerable populations in low income households.”

To help celebrate the month and to address today’s pressing home health issues, HUD and the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) are co-hosting an annual National Healthy Homes Educational Conference from June 13-16, 2016 in San Antonio. The State of Big Ideas: Moving Environmental Health Outside the Box conference will gather 1,200 environmental health and healthy housing professionals for an in-depth look at some of the most important issues facing the nation such as water quality, healthy housing and communities, asthma, emergency preparedness and more. 

Currently, millions of American homes have moderate-to-severe physical housing problems, including lead-based paint hazards, dilapidated structure; roofing problems; heating, plumbing, and electrical deficiencies; water leaks and intrusion; pests; damaged paint; and high radon gas levels.  These conditions are associated with a wide range of health issues, including unintentional injuries, respiratory illnesses like asthma and radon-induced lung cancer.

National Healthy Homes Month 2016 will focus national attention on ways to keep people of all ages safe and healthy in their homes.  To mark this month-long campaign, HUD Secretary Julián Castro, produced a video highlighting the direct link between a household’s health and the conditions within their homes.

Recently, HUD unveiled the Healthy Homes App, designed to raise awareness about potentially serious health and safety problems in the home and the steps consumers can take to protect themselves.

For more information on National Healthy Homes Month 2016, visit HUD’s website.   RISMedia Tracking Snippet *** Do Not Remove *** End RISMedia Tracking Snippet

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2016. All rights reserved.

If you are interested in buying or selling real estate in the Energy Corridor, please contact Connie Vallone with First Market Realty at 713 249 4177, connie@knowsrealestate.com   or visit www.houstonenergycorridorhomes.com  or www.vallonehomes.com .

 

Want to Lower Energy Bills for Good? Small Improvements Equal Big Returns

In Buying a Home, Environmentmentally Friendly Homes, Home Upgrades, Home Values, Houston Energy Corridor, Houston Real Estate Agent, Real Estate Investment, Selling your home on January 27, 2016 at 4:47 pm

There are several ways to improve the energy-efficiency of your home—and many are too costly for the average homeowner to finance. The truth is, you don’t have to spend a fortune to reap the benefits of increased energy-efficiency. In fact, you can save up to 30 percent on energy bills every month with a simple, DIY home energy audit, plus the following inexpensive fixes:

1. Take advantage of the automatic setting on your air conditioner. This turns your AC and heater automatically on or off to save energy.

2. Pay attention to rooms that you are not using. Close those air vents in order to avoid needlessly cooling or heating unused spaces.

3. Look for openings around window and door frames where air can enter or escape the home. Block them with weather strips or draft guards.

4. Non-insulated attics are a major source of energy loss, as they do not effectively protect your home’s interior from outside temperatures. Make sure to insulate your attic properly and ask for help from a certified contractor if you are not sure how to do it yourself.

5. Replace incandescent light bulbs with LED or CFL models that last much longer and save significant amounts of energy and money in the long run.

Source: Homeselfe

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2016. All rights reserved.

If you are interested in buying or selling real estate in West Houston, please contact Connie Vallone with First Market Realty at 713 249 4177  or visit www.houstonenergycorridorhomes.com  or www.vallonehomes.com .

Homeownership Linked to Happiness

In Buying a Home, Environmentmentally Friendly Homes, Home Values, Houston Energy Corridor, Houston Real Estate Agent, new homes houston energy corridor, Selling your home on September 18, 2015 at 2:13 pm

Based on data from the OECD Better Life Index, homeownership in the U.S. can lead to higher levels of subjective well-being. Translation: homeownership is linked to happiness.

The Better Life Index gauges worldwide development, zeroing in on quality of life indicators that affect global progress – housing, jobs, civic engagement, health and safety, to name a few. The objective? To answer to the age-old question: How’s life?

At face value, this assessment is dead-on – most agents can attest to smiling faces when first-time buyers become homeowners – but that heightened sense of well-being may be more closely tied to our basic need for shelter, according to Aida Caldera Sánchez and Caroline Tassot, authors of a recent Index analysis. And, when viewed through American Dream-colored glasses, homeownership lends itself to status and independence, qualities that resonate with those seeking to better their lives.

In addition, the Index measures well-being indicators on a regional scale. Housing performs better than all other indicators in 75 percent of states in the Midwest. In the South, housing tops all other indicators in 70.6 percent of states in the region. In the West, housing in just 15 percent of states outperforms other indicators like environment and education. Income trumps housing in 55.5 percent of states in the Northeast – and it is also the dominant indicator in states home to major metropolitan areas, including New York, Illinois, Texas and California.

View this original post on RISMedia’s blog, Housecall. Check the blog daily for winning real estate tips and trends for you and your clients.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2015. All rights reserved.

I am happy to help you buy or sell your home! Call Connie Vallone at 713-249-4177 .

Three Ways to Become More Eco-Friendly at Home

In Environmentmentally Friendly Homes, Home Upgrades, Real Estate Investment, Recycling in West Houston on February 22, 2015 at 5:58 pm

Three Ways to Become More Eco-Friendly at Home 

Create an Environmentally Home

Create an Environmentally Home


(BPT) – Whether you’re motivated by a workplace initiative, a personal goal or the opportunity to teach your children lifelong positive habits, now is a great time to become more environmentally friendly.

Here are three ways your family can create positive environmental change starting today:

Recycle
Research shows that less than two percent of waste in the United States is recycled, yet almost half of all trash can be recycled. School lunches are one source of waste that most families don’t consider. These are packed each morning and tossed away each afternoon once lunchtime is over.

Protect water resources
Water is one of the most important resources people have, yet every year billions of gallons are needlessly wasted. You can conserve water in your home by teaching your children to take shorter showers or baths, turning off dripping faucets and avoiding letting the water run while they are brushing their teeth. You can also reduce water waste in your home by investing in water-saving appliances and by reducing or eliminating the practice of watering your lawn, relying on rain to do so instead.

Plant a tree
Trees are more than just a beautiful backdrop; they are also essential to the environment. Trees improve the quality of the air you breathe by capturing dust and pollution particles that can affect your health. As trees grow, they remove greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide from the air, store carbon, and release pure oxygen into the atmosphere And, trees properly planted around a home can help lower air conditioning and heating costs by up to 25 percent

www.HoustonEnergyCorridorHomes.com    or www.vallonehomes.com 

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2015. All rights reserved.